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DIY mailbox that looks like a wooden house

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Lets make a DIY mailbox that looks like a house! How to make a mailbox may sound intimidating but it’s really a fairly simple project depending on how detailed you want to get. My dad and I recently decided that our existing mailbox needed to be replaced as it was almost 30 years old, rotted, was not rust proof and falling apart.

Whether you are updating a post mounted mailbox or a wall mounted mailbox, this step by step tutorial will teach you how to build your own wooden mailbox in an afternoon.

The old mailbox was literally hanging by a nail! I should note, this project took place at our old house (which you can take a tour of by clicking through this post, “our multigenerational home for sale.“)

We spent a Saturday afternoon constructing the new heavy duty mailbox and the following day adding the finishing touches.

Be sure to check your local residential mailbox guidelines before you start making changes. Many towns have a certain post height in order to make mail delivery feasible for the drivers.

DIY Mailbox

If you searched Google and Pinterest (like I did) for mailbox ideas, you likely found thousands of mailbox designs resembling everything from a modern mailbox house to a farmhouse design. We opted to “wing it” and make a mailbox that resembled a simple clean line house and painted it the same color as our house.

how to make a mailbox

We measured the existing mailbox base and decided to customize the new mailbox house to the existing dimensions. Someday we will add a new mailbox post and base (the base is what your mailbox sits on and is attached to) but for now, the mailbox is the first priority.

We used pressure treated wood as it’s weather resistant and will not rot.

This mailbox diy post is something that we used left over scrap wood from a previous project so it didn’t cost us a lot of money. You will need to invest a small amount of money to purchase the following materials/supplies.

I would say this is an intermediate diy project as you will need some knowledge about cutting wood angles and have the correct saws to complete the project.

DIY Mailbox Supplies needed:

1″ pressure treated wood, 1 1/4″ finish nails, finish nail-gun, compressor, 1 1/4″ galvanized screws, miter saw, table saw (or have your wood pre-cut at your local lumber store)  3M Tekk Protection safety glasses, 3M Patch Plus Primer, 3M Wood Filler, 3M Advanced Abrasives sandpaper, 3M Tekk Protection digital WorkTunes Hearing Protector, paint and mail box accessories (flag, knob and house number).

DIY Mailbox Base Wood dimensions:

 1″ x 7″ cut to the length of 17 1/4 “

 (2) 1″x3″ cut to the length of 17 1/4″

(2) 1″ x 3″ cut to the length of 8 1/4″

pressure treated wood for a wooden mailbox project

We used a finish gun to nail the sides to the base. Once you are finished with each section, you will need to reinforce the areas that you nailed with galvanized screws to ensure stability.

In our case, we need to make sure the plow trucks don’t send our little o’l homemade mailbox for a ride during the winter snowy months.

man nailing a wooden mailbox base

This part fits right on top of our existing mailbox base.

wooden mailbox base

Next we cut our sides of the mailbox. Be sure to wear safety glasses.

man cutting pressure treated wood with a table sawWhile my dad was cutting the rest of the wood, I listened to some tunes on my 3M Tekk Protection headphones (which are kind of cool I might add) and screwed the base together. They play am/fm radio or you can use your ipod.

TIP: Don’t forget as you work, to reinforce with screws.

woman building a wooden mailbox with chop saw

Wooden DIY Mailbox – Dimensions

Mailbox Bottom dimension: 1″ x 10″ cut to the length of 20″ (1 piece)

Mailbox Side dimensions: 1″ x 7″ cut to length of 20″ (2 pieces).

Nail the mailbox bottom and sides to the base.

pressure treated wooden mailbox sides, base and bottom

You will need to flip the box over in order to nail the sides to the base.

man using a nail gun to build a wooden mailbox roof

Wooden Mailbox Roof dimensions:

1″ x 7″ cut to length of 22″ (2 pieces)

We cut the “peak” of the roof at a 30 degree angle using our miter saw. We assembled the roof together before we added it to the sides of the mailbox.

man building a wooden mailbox roof at 30 degree angle

3M Tekk Protection offers clear and a sunglass version of safety glasses. My dad wanted the regular eye safety glasses so I wore the sunglass version. I thought my sunglasses were quiet stylish. The nice part about the sunglasses, you can still see to work! They do not make everything super dark.

father and daughter building a wooden mailbox

Mailbox End front piece dimension:

You will need to make a door as well as a 30 degree peak for the front of your mailbox.

We cut the piece (with our miter saw set to a 30 degree angle) to fit up into the peak of the roof first and then nailed it to the roof part of the mailbox.

See the 30 degree angle below with a length of 8 1/2 ” long by 4 1/4 ” high.

wooden mailbox roof dimensions written on pressure treated woodNail this piece up under the roof in the front (where your door goes). See below.

Next cut a smaller piece (same as above) but only 3″ high. You need to do this in order for your door to have something to rest against or you may need to use a magnet set on the door to keep it closed.

wooden mailbox roof dimensions written on pressure treated wood

man building a wooden mailbox roof

Mailbox Door dimension:

Our door is 8 1/2″ wide by 7″ high. Use a piano hinge or side bolts to assemble the door to the mailbox. We used a piano hinge.

mans hand opening wooden mailbox letter door

Do the same for the back of the mailbox except you do not need to make a door. I decided that I wanted it to be two pieces because I wanted a bit of dimension, not all one piece. You can do either but I liked the option of being able to paint the back piece a two-toned color. You will see what I mean at the end once it is all painted.

wooden mailbox dimensions

Now it was time to fill the holes, sand and paint our homemade house mailbox.

how to make a mailboxI let my son try out the headphones and he loved listening to his kidz pop tunes while he was teaching himself how to make a mailbox. So cute!

little boy wearing 3m teak headphones playing with wood

Viola, the diy wooden mailbox project is complete!

DIY Mailbox Post

We used our old round metal mailbox post and added a new frame bracket underneath our DIY mailbox to fasten. I thought I had pictures of the rusted mailbox post but I seem to have lost them! I ended up spray painting the old post black to give it a new fresh look.

You could purchase a cast aluminum, stainless steel or even a vinyl mailbox post.

Another option would be to make a DIY mailbox post out of 6×6 cedar or pressure wood which are both weather/rot resistant. Cedar would add natural charm but would most likely cost more.

wooden mailbox that looks like a house with dark brown roof and red flag

You can add whatever decorative elements you want or even stencil your name or house number. I chose to purchase the aluminum black numbers and I spray painted a wooden knob as the door pull.

I decided to the paint the mailbox similar colors to our home to coordinate the two.

wooden house mailbox with letters inside

I also spray painted the existing metal mailbox post a deep brown color and it actually looks brand new!

wooden mailbox that looks like a house with dark brown roof

wooden mailbox that looks like a house with dark brown roof

Save or Print this mailbox makeover tutorial below.

Yield: 1

DIY Mailbox

favorite diy projects july

How to make a wooden mailbox that looks like a house. We used scrap wood to make our mailbox and it cost almost nothing!

Active Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours
Difficulty medium

Materials

  • Supplies needed:
  • 1" pressure treated wood, 1 1/4" finish nails, finish nail-gun, compressor, 1 1/4" galvanized screws, miter saw, table saw (or have your wood pre-cut at your local lumber store)  3M Tekk Protection safety glasses, 3M Patch Plus Primer, 3M Wood Filler, 3M Advanced Abrasives sandpaper, 3M Tekk Protection digital WorkTunes Hearing Protector, paint and mail box accessories (flag, knob and house number).

Tools

  • hammer, finish nail gun, compressor, miter saw, table saw, measuring tape

Instructions

  1. Base Wood dimensions:

     1" x 7" cut to the length of 17 1/4 "

     (2) 1"x3" cut to the length of 17 1/4"

    (2) 1" x 3" cut to the length of 8 1/4"
  2. Bottom dimension: 1" x 10" cut to the length of 20" (1 piece)
  3. Side dimensions: 1" x 7" cut to length of 20" (2 pieces).
  4. Roof dimensions:

    1" x 7" cut to length of 22" (2 pieces)

    You will need to make a door as well as a 30 degree peak for the front of your mailbox. We cut the piece (with our miter saw set to a 30 degree angle) to fit up into the peak of the roof first and then nailed it to the roof part of the mailbox. See the 30 degree angle below with a length of 8 1/2 " long by 4 1/4 " high.
  5. Door dimension:
    Our door is 8 1/2" wide by 7" high. Use a piano hinge or side bolts to assemble the door to the mailbox. We used a piano hinge.

Keep in mind there are several curbside mailbox options (some that are even extra large if you get a high volume amount of mail) and if you are not game for making your own, you can always install a plastic mailbox or a galvanized steel mailbox with several mailbox features.

Locking mailboxes are great for wall mounted versions on your house and offer a variety of features that normally are not on curbside mailboxes.

A DIY mailbox that looks like a wooden house may seem overwhelming at first and I won’t lie, I was a little overwhelmed when we started this project but as we got going, it moved right along.

Total time for the project was 2.5 hours constructing and another 3 hours prepping for paint and adding the accessories.

If you are looking for more diy mailbox house ideas, google “diy mailbox ideas or homemade diy mailbox ideas.” Check out our other easy DIY projects on our home page.

This post was a collaboration with 3M Tekk Protection

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20 Comments

  1. I love how cute this turned out Jess!! shared on pinterest and G+

  2. It turned out great Jess! I like how you walk us through the process step-by-step. Very helpful! Those 3M Headphones are a hot item in our house too! Sharing & Pinning this!

  3. Amazing! Never would’ve thought to make my own mailbox. My mailman would be ever so appreciative so he didn’t have to keep shoving my magazines through the door slot :).

    1. This is a very neat project, BUT, you should be aware that because it is not USPS Postmaster approved, your mailperson can actually refuse to use it !!! The Postmaster approved thing is why many custom mailboxes are built around a standard mailbox.

  4. WAY cuter than buying one! you and your dad make quite a team. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Heather

  5. Mrs. Blanco says:

    The finish product needs weather proofing please put shingles on the roof to weather proof the mailbox other wise it is a very cute and lovably project.

    Truly Yours Pat.

  6. Jose Luis says:

    great project and thanks for sharing. can you please tell me what kind of wood you guys used. Thanks

  7. Courtney Cloe says:

    I love your mailbox! I am wondering if you had a problem with your mailman taking your mail; I was under the impression it has to say USPS approved on the door? I hope it isn’t an issue, I would love to build one!

    1. The postal code does require an approved mailbox, but, that doesn’t your letter carrier will refuse to deliver. You could have the same carrier for ten years who doesn’t care; get a new carrier who makes an issue of it and you need a new mailbox or you’ll have pick up your mail at the Post Office.

      Build this around an approved mailbox and you’re good to go (as long as the pick-up flag is relocated to the outside).

  8. Rebecca Starr Goode says:

    What keeps the door shut? Just pressure from the sides? Over a little time wouldn’t the wood swell and/or shrink; causing door problems? Thanks, R. Goode

    1. You could add a little eye hook but ours stayed shut due to the pressure on the sides